Browser wars summed up

I recently “upgraded” to IE 9 on one of my systems.  Remember that  “upgrade” doesn’t mean “better.”

This cartoon sums up the browser wars pretty damn accurately.

Tech Tip of the Day

This one comes from Crystal and is IMNSHO bloody well spot on!

I was just thinking: If you’re viewing the internet with Internet Explorer, you’re doing it wrong.

Yup, I’ve been using Opera, Firefox & Chrome for years.  I tried using the IE the other day, and the thing just felt broken.    Just bad UI experience.

I called the Chrome OS back in October

Google announced an OS based on Chrome, this is supposed be a seperate OS than Android, which is already shipping on smartphones and has been ported to netbooks.

The Chrome OS is based on open source LINUX code, and Google plans on freely distributing the OS. This can’t make Microsoft very happy.

Back in October 2008, I noticed that Chrome had the potential to be a thin layer OS.

One of the exisiting theories is that Chrome is the first componet of a Google OS.  Chrome is supposed to be the interface to the applications.  If you look under the hood of Chrome, it is built more like an OS than a browser.

All it will need is a thin layer to access the hardware (boot, and then interface with video/storage/audio/periferal I/O(USB for a start)/network interfaces)  and it’s pretty much good to go.

This would a thin client model with most of the applications out in the cloud, and as much of the data. as well.

Microsoft is going into the cloud

Microsoft is playing catchup with Google and entering the Cloud Computing space. Here is what CEO Steve Balmer had to say about it:

 “We need a new operating system designed for the cloud and we will introduce one in about four weeks, we’ll even have a name to give you by then. But let’s just call it, for the purposes of today, Windows Cloud.

“Just like Windows Server looked a lot like Windows but with new properties, new characteristics and new features, so will Windows Cloud look a lot like Windows Server.”

We’re not driving an agenda towards being service providers, but we’ve gotta build a service that is Windows in the cloud.”

Microsoft probably feeds the need to respond to Google’s new browser, Chrome.  What I’m hearing about Chrome is that isn’t so much as a entry into the browser market, but a platform for more robust “cloud” based apps such as Google Documents.

One of the exisiting theories is that Chrome is the first componet of a Google OS.  Chrome is supposed to be the interface to the applications.  If you look under the hood of Chrome, it is built more like an OS than a browser.  

All it will need is a thin layer to access the hardware (boot, and then interface with video/storage/audio/periferal I/O(USB for a start)/network interfaces)  and it’s pretty much good to go.

This would a thin client model with most of the applications out in the cloud, and as much of the data as well.

It seems that Microsoft is taking this serious enough to announce their own cloud base computing plan.

It will be interesting to see how this plays out.

Google jumps into the browser market

Google has come out with an open source browser.  It’s called Chrome.

Of course, being the geek I am, I am writing this post using Chrome.

It’s a fairly straightforward, clean, Google like interface, based on tabs.  From what I’ve read, the special sauce is under the hood, specifically the tabs.

From what I’ve read, the tabs are supposed to be fairly seperate entities.   If a process goes south in one tab, it only takes out that tab, not the entire browser.

Currently only available on XP/Vista.  No Mac or LINUX support.  

I’ll report more about it after I have banged on it some more.